Columbia University History of Science Society


Past Events: Newton and Arsenic Poisoning in Bangladesh
April 12, 2010, 3:45 am
Filed under: Events

Watch updates of our previous discussions:

“Newton: The Man Who Hated Everyone (but was a genius)”
with Gillian Drake, BC 2010

“Arsenic Poisoning in Bangladesh”
with Kim Wu, BC 2010



Forming the NYU-CU History of Science Society and Other Events
April 1, 2010, 5:10 am
Filed under: Events

CUHSS with be collaborating with NYU Gallatin School students for future events! This is most exciting given the flood of e-mails that the cuhss gmail account received after months of inactivity. Here is what is in store for the future:

1) Public Health Panel
Organized by the CU History of Science Society and the Pre-Health Students Organization, the public health panel is designed for students interested in the interactions between society, medicine, culture, and politics. Panel organizers have invited professors from the history and sociology department who specialize in using a multidisciplinary approach of understanding the broader context of public health at home and abroad. Invited panelist speakers include:

Dr. David Rosner, Lauterstein Professor of Sociomedical Science and History at Columbia and Co-Director of the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Dr. Sam Roberts who specializes in the history of post-emancipation African-American social movements, class formations, and urban political economy. His most recent publication Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation explores the political economy of health and tuberculosis control from the late nineteenth century and the mid-twentieth century.

Dr. Diane Vaughan of Columbia’s sociology department who studies the sociology of organizations, of culture, the deviance of social controls, field methods, research design, science knowledge, and technology. She is particularly interested in how the social (history, institutions, organizations) affect individual meanings, decisions, and action.

2) Movie Screenings

The Tacit Tumor recently completed by Lan Li introduces the historical, political, social, and theoretical facets of integrating Chinese and Western medicine to treat cancer tumors in China. It is a short documentary, running less than 30 minutes, and primarily serves to stimulate discussion to reexamine the history of health care and the role of science in society. Here is the official trailer for the film: http://www.youtube.com/hisofsciresearch

SECERCY, directed by Harvard professors Peter Galison and Rob Moss, is about secret files in the government that developed after efforts to protect information on the Manhattan Project during WWII. Since then, more documents have been added to these files and SECRECY explores the tensions between our safety as a nation and our ability to function as a democracy. Galison and Moss interview head directors of the CIA as well as many other high-profile individuals serving to withhold information from the American public. You can find more information on the film here: http://secrecyfilm.com/